4 Free Disciple-Making Resources from Matthias Media

Our friends at Matthias Media are doing what they can to continue to partner with the church by providing top-notch resources for making disciples.

Some of their books we’ve mentioned on this blog before include The Trellis and the Vine by Tony Payne and Colin Marshall, One-to-One Bible Reading by David Helm, and God of Word: The Word, the Spirit and how God speaks to us by John Woodhouse.

In a recent COVID-19 related update, Matthias Media announced how they are operating and shared how to get a few resources in the “Free Digital Resources for You” section.

If you email Marty (msweeney@matthiasmedia.com) or call the Matthias Media office (1-866-407-4530), you can get a copy (PDF and/or Kindle) of the following titles:

You’ll also be interested to note a 50% off sale on the following resources:

  • The Everlasting God by Broughton Knox – “Few minds have explored the depths of God’s revelation with such humble and innovative perception,” says Phillip Jenson of this book’s author.
  • Full of Promise – Learn how the entire Old Testament fits together as one great story about God.
  • From Sinner to Saint DVD Study by John Chapman – Though Chappo is well into his 70’s when this video was made, I had a youth pastor tell me that his kids were enthralled going through this course. Great for a weekly family study!
  • Wisdom in Leadership by Craig Hamilton – what better time to dive into this thick but valuable book? As one Amazon review says “this is the best kept secret in ministry leadership.”

In addition to these suggestions, all orders with Matthias Media have free shipping to US addresses.

Does it make sense to equip pastors in the U.S.?

“Let’s start training pastors here in the U.S.” 

When I first heard this idea, I thought to myself: Why would we do that? Don’t pastors here have plenty of resources and training opportunities? That would never work.

Well, I was wrong . . . dead wrong. For the past 12 years, we’ve been equipping pastors in the U.S. and it has proven both invaluable and strategic. Even though many pastors here have been to Bible school or seminary, they find our training to be “simple yet profound.” 

Many have expressed how their preaching has been elevated and sharpened because of what they have learned. And many have used the same training process to equip emerging leaders within their own churches.

But there’s even more. Some, like Pastor Justin, take our training overseas . . . on their own. Justin attends one of our training groups in Ft. Myers, Florida. He was heading to India and Sri Lanka to work with pastors and asked if it would be okay for him to use our training materials and methods. Our answer was, “Of course!”


                                                        Pastor Justin with an excited trainee


So, this past January, Justin worked with six different groups of pastors, leading them through the book of Titus. Pastors there enjoyed a rich feast on God’s Word. The response was overwhelming. Here’s what one pastor said:

While traveling to this training, my brother and I were discussing how so many preachers only share their opinion and stories . . . they don’t preach the Word. We [get to the] training and it’s all about the same subject we were discussing. Only the Holy Spirit can do that!

The results: 158 South Asian pastors equipped to more faithfully study, teach, and preach God’s Word in 128 different churches. At the end, they were eager for Justin to come back. They want more! 

So, does it make sense to equip pastors in the U.S.? Absolutely!


Here are some photos of groups Justin and his team trained:


Preventing Disqualifying Sins in Ministry: A Conversation

The apostle Paul wrote to Timothy in 1 Timothy 4:16 to “watch your life and doctrine closely. Persevere in them, because if you do, you will save both yourself and your hearers” (NIV). 

Unfortunately, it doesn’t take long to think of ministers who haven’t watched their lives or doctrine closely. Within the last couple of years, two high-profile pastors in the Chicago area have had their sin exposed publicly, even covered by news outlets like the Chicago Tribune.

Major sin by Christian leaders leads to great pain, not only in the ministers’ lives but also in their families and churches, and often can damage Christian witness in the community.

John Eichholz

So how can we think biblically about preventing sins that disqualify from ministry?

To answer that question, Kevin Halloran spoke with John Eichholz, a former pastor and current Field Director for our ministry. In our conversation, we discussed:

  • warning signs that someone is headed down a bad road;
  • attitudes and relationships we need in order to avoid disqualifying sins; and
  • how to establish healthy and transparent ministry teams.

In conversations like this it’s crucial that we define terms, so let me very broadly define “disqualifying sins” as any sin that would make a Christian leader violate the qualifications for elders as found in 1 Timothy 3 and Titus 1.

We realize the seriousness of this conversation. We engage in it humbly and with much trepidation. Our prayer is that God would use this conversation to strengthen your walk with Him, to expose sin where it is needed, and also to encourage all of us by reminding us of all that God has given us in Christ to enable us to walk in holiness and in grace.



Read the transcript of the interview:

How can we equip exponentially more?

How was Leadership Resources able to increase the number of training groups from around 100 in 2013 to over 600 today?

Two words: mentor trainers.

Mentor trainers (MTs) are the key graduates who share our passion for training others and long to see God’s Word move powerfully in their country and beyond. They also continue to receive training from LRI to strengthen them for their work.

Let’s look at a recent training for mentor trainers in Ecuador to see how we invest in our MTs for their vital work. December’s training time had three main focuses: 

1. Word Work – This group studied Paul’s letter to the Philippians, not only for more practice interpreting a book with LRI’s principles of interpretation, but also to consider a major theme of Philippians and our work: gospel partnership.


Ecuadorian MTers join LRI’s Kevin Halloran (top left) and Patricio Paredes (top middle)


2. Program Work – In addition to evaluating how a recent training went, the Ecuador team conducted a SWOT analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) of our work in Ecuador. The exercise helped our team clarify their present reality as well as give fodder for praise and prayer. LRI staff also coached the team on raising funds to make their own training ministry self-sustaining. On LRI’s last day in the country, the Ecuadorian team even presented a funding proposal to a potential partner.


The Ecuador team working through the SWOT analysis.


3. Team Building – The Ecuadorian MTs are from two different cities with two very different cultures. To lead a movement of the Word together, it’s vital for them to trust each other and be comfortable relationally. Thankfully, activities like sharing meals, swapping stories, and playing sports help with team bonding. And of course, prayer is vital for strengthening team relationships.

By God’s grace, it’s through mentor training teams like this one that God’s Word is able to impact exponentially more pastors and leaders – all for the glory of God.


After a tiring game of 2-on-2 basketball, Moises, Patricio, and Clever watch Juan battle Oscar in tennis. (Did you know the ball flies differently in the mountains?)


LRI staff Patricio Paredes (far left) and Kevin Halloran (bottom right) enjoy delicious corbiche with mentor trainers in Portoviejo.


PS: We have the wonderful opportunity to bring together mentor trainers from all over the globe for a summit in Brazil this March. Would you pray that God would use that event to encourage and equip our MTs so they can better strengthen His church around the world?

31 Days of Prayer for LRI

Enjoying Your God in Prayer

Dear Praying Friends and Partners,

Thank you for praying for us. Your prayers are a very real way in which you partner with us. Let me share with you both a disappointment and a glory to spur you on to even more faithful and fervent prayer. 

Last year we asked you to pray that our team could travel into a restricted-access country undetected and not jeopardize the security of the pastors who are being trained. Unfortunately, the police broke up one of our training times in this country and interrogated both the pastors and our staff. Everyone was eventually released, but we believe that our presence in this country is now compromised and have decided not to continue ministry there for the foreseeable future. 

We also asked you to pray for our Ukrainian in-country leader as he forms a national training team empowered to lead training throughout the country. This past year our Ethiopian in-country leader traveled to Ukraine and helped the brothers there form this team. We rejoice that the Lord is developing a global network of pastor-trainers who are committed to helping one another.

So please, keep praying. The battle is real!

With much confidence in Christ,

Craig Parro

President

P.S. – You can use this PDF to print a copy of the prayer requests.


Please pray for . . .

  1. India – as new doors open for our training, that God would provide committed individuals to bring this training to Northeast, Northwest, and Central India.
  2. Bangladesh – for the formation of Bengali mentor trainers and a movement of training in 2020.
  3. Restricted country in Southeast Asia – for protection from government discovery of the training and for the underground churches in this closed country.
  4. USA – for discernment of the most strategic training opportunities in North America.
  5. USA – for expanded leadership through the establishment of a national training team.
  6. USA – that we could recruit a regional director.
  7. Europe – Pray for wisdom and discernment to choose mentor trainers to lead the work in Europe.
  8. Ukraine – for the mentor trainer team to continue to grow in character and competence as they lead training across the country.
  9. Europe – for the European leadership team to develop and work alongside us as we spread the work through Europe in the coming years.
  10. Communications Team – that God gives us humility and grace in new working relationships.
  11. Communications Team – that God allows us to find and clearly communicate the stories of Him at work so that we might inspire worship.
  12. Communications Team – that God would lead our rebranding process and help us complete excellent work that will put God’s glory on display.
  13. Technology Team – that God gives us wisdom to discover and implement tools that will keep our staff and partners safe as they do their work.
  14. Technology Team – that God gives us wisdom and servant-mindedness to train staff and partners with tools that will help them collaborate even more effectively.
  15. Technology Team – that God helps us to accomplish the huge amount of work before us in the next year to build and implement unseen technology systems to support the ministry of equipping pastors to teach God’s Word.
  16. Africa – that the Spirit of God will continue to refresh the African team and use His Word through us as we continue to see a movement of the Word flourish. 
  17. Africa – for the east Africa leadership team as they joyfully expand the training throughout Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania. 
  18. Africa – for the development of partnerships throughout southern Africa (countries such as South Africa, Zambia, Malawi, Zimbabwe, and Swaziland).
  19. Middle East – for wisdom in the next steps as we have many partnership opportunities in several countries throughout the Middle East. 
  20. Latin America – for new training possibilities in Mexico City, Chile, and Panama.
  21. Latin America – for ongoing mentor training groups in Ecuador, Colombia, and Honduras and for groups starting soon in Costa Rica, Peru, and Cuba.
  22. Latin America – for the consolidation of national teams and for a regional meeting of mentor trainers we hope to have.
  23. Russia – that God would give our colleague, “V”, all of the wisdom and grace he needs as he grows in leadership in Russia and completes his doctoral dissertation as well.
  24. Central Asia – that God would give our colleague, “J”, the grace and wisdom he needs as he prepares to take over the position of Regional Director for Central Asia this year.
  25. Russian and Central Asia – that God would enable our country directors in Central Asia and Russia to assume the places of leadership needed to advance a movement of the Word in their regions.
  26. Southeast Asia – for potential work in several countries we’ve been trying to start work in (Cambodia, Thailand, and a restricted-access country).
  27. Myanmar – that future movement leaders would develop from the two new groups we are launching.
  28. Indonesia – for leadership development and that God would provide many gifted mentor trainers to lead a movement in this country.
  29. The Philippines – for Filipino leaders to expand their leadership team to shepherd a movement over the long term.
  30. Finance Team – that everyone at LRI would maintain their sense of gratitude to God for the faithful way he provides for this ministry. 
  31. Finance Team – for godly wisdom for everyone at LRI who makes decisions and prioritizes how resources should be stewarded for the greatest good of the mission.

Have Bible Quoters Replaced Bible Readers?

Merely quoting verses is not “staying on the line” if you miss the intention of the author in the passage. After all, even Satan quoted Scripture when he tempted Jesus (Matthew 4:1–11; Luke 4:1–13).

In a recent article called, Have Bible Quoters Replaced Bible Readers?, Russell Moore explains why only quoting Scripture (as opposed to reading it well) is dangerous. Moore shares the following explanation from David Niehuis of how the issue often manifests itself:

“Some of my students attend popular non-denominational churches led by entrepreneurial leaders who claim to be ‘Bible believing’ and strive to offer sermons that are ‘relevant’ for successful Christian living. . . . Unfortunately, in too many cases, this formula results in a preacher appealing to a short text of Scripture, out of context, in order to support a predetermined set of ‘biblical principles’ to guide the congregants’ daily lives. The only Bible these students encounter, sadly, is the version that is carefully distilled according to the theological and ideological concerns that have shaped the spiritual formation of the lead pastor.”

Moore continues to diagnose the issue:

This is not a matter of the educated versus the uneducated. The same problem exists among both. I have noticed people who were experts in the grammar of the Hebrew and Greek Bibles who didn’t really get the flow of the old, old story. But if the Bible is God’s Word, and it is, we must raise up people who don’t merely believe it but also know what it says.

We encourage you to read the article in its entirety. We also encourage you to think through how you can lead the people under your care toward greater Bible literacy by modeling faithful Bible reading and by training others in the Scriptures. As David Jackman has said, it’s not enough to consult the Bible only when we need direction or an answer, we need God’s message in the Bible to sit in the driver’s seat of the church.

For practical ways to make the Bible user-friendly from the pulpit, read this article.

Dick Lucas on Preaching the Melodic Line: How Grand Themes Enrich a Sermon

Many musical compositions come back to a key melody time and time again. The sound track of many movies even feature a key melodic line that helps tell the story and carry emotional weight. In a similar way, books of the Bible have a “melodic line” that repeats, sharing the book’s main idea and intended response.

There’s no one more qualified to go deeper on the what, the why, and the how of preaching the melodic line than our preaching hero, Dick Lucas. Lucas, now retired, founded the Proclamation Trust to raise up the next generation of Bible expositors. (Listen to our conversation with Dick Lucas on his life and legacy.)

Listen below or read the transcript of the interview that originally ran on PreachingToday.com.



PreachingToday.com: What do you mean when you talk about preaching the melodic line of a text?

Dick Lucas: I didn’t invent the term melodic line, but it’s become quite well known. The melodic line is taken from the fact that a piece of music has a tune or a line going through it that holds the whole thing together. We want to show that in a New Testament letter, for example, a theme holds the whole thing together. Therefore, to take verses and passages out of the context of that melodic line, that theme, that argument that runs through the letter, would not be profitable.

For example, 2 Timothy 3:16 is often taken out to prove the inspiration of Scripture, which, of course, it does prove. But if you put it in the melodic line of the letter, you find it is Paul’s instructions to Timothy as to how he is to continue his ministry, and Paul is saying the one equipment Timothy needs for his ministry is the Word of God, which will enable him and train him in righteousness and correction and all the rest of it. I know a principal of a theological college who is determined to bring everything in the curriculum under 2 Timothy 3:16. That is, he wants the Bible to control all the other disciplines. That’s really what Paul is saying to Timothy. Although the verse does teach the inspiration of Scripture, and indeed without that the Scriptures would not be powerful to do the work, the verse is talking specifically to the person of God — to the minister, to the pastor, to the teacher — and telling him how he is to be fully equipped.

How does that principle work itself out in the preparation of a sermon?

Say I’m doing a series on the Epistle to Jude. It starts with that wonderful statement that we’re kept by Christ, and it finishes with that wonderful doxology, “Unto him that is able to keep you from falling.” If you look at the material in the middle of the Letter, the emphasis is on how we are to keep ourselves from disaster through obedience to the faith and to the standards God has laid down. There is a remarkable balance. God keeps his people — we all know that. But the letter is saying it’s not enough to know God keeps you. The sign that God is keeping his people is that they’re keeping themselves. That gives me a grip on the Letter. It shows me what it’s about, where it’s going. There are some tricky and important verses in Jude I might spend a whole sermon on, but if I’ve got the pattern and argument of the Letter, it’s going to make a good deal more sense.

When you preach on one section of a Book, do you still scan the entire Book to bring out this melodic line?

It’s one of the most important disciplines of the preacher. It’s alarming if you go to a church where a team of preachers is doing a series on Hebrews, for example, and each preacher has a different idea what the Book is about. It’s absolutely essential to know the way the melodic line, the argument, the theme of the Book, is going.

What are some of the secrets you’ve found for finding the melodic line of a Book and for weaving that in and out of a sermon in a way that keeps people interested?

That is the hard work of preparation. It is exciting to find the reason why the Book was written. The difficulty is that the scholar, in writing his commentary — and of course they’re essential for us as part of our work — inevitably will be a detail man. He will tell you what every word means, where it comes from; he’ll tell you about every dot and comma. That’s fine, but I also want to know why it’s there; and that the commentators are not usually so good at, because their scholarly skills are honed for the technical matters.

If I wrote a letter to a friend saying I was catching a train and would meet him at Cambridge at three o’clock, and that letter was dug up in 2,000 years, the scholar would not be interested in why the letter was written. He would look at the details of the letter and write monographs on them. For example, in the letter I might have said I would call in at McDonalds on the way to Cambridge. The scholar would say, “This fellow 2,000 years ago must have been a Scotsman and had Scottish friends he called in on.” Then somebody else with a Ph.D. would discover McDonalds was a café. All that is interesting, but it’s not what the letter was written about. The letter was written to say, “Will you meet me at three o’clock?” So the letter of 2 Peter is written to warn me that I will be carried away from my stability unless I grow in the grace and knowledge of God. That governs the whole letter. So I need to know why he wrote the letter if I’m going to look at the details.

Do you generally find a key verse that tips you off, or is it repetition that cues you in on the key thought?

Sometimes it is a key verse. One of the verses we used recently was Hebrews 13:8. It’s what I call a “kitchen calendar text”: “Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and forever.” Few people have the foggiest idea what it actually means. But it’s a key to Hebrews, because it is saying that Jesus Christ, in his work as a priest and in his bringing the revelation of God, is remaining forever and ever. If the Queen of England remained forever and ever, Prince Charles would never be king. So if the priest stays forever and ever, there will never be another priest. That tells me that the theme of Hebrews has to do with the finished work of Christ on the cross and that there doesn’t need to be another priest, because he’s the priest forever and ever. If he’s a priest forever and ever, that means he’s finished his redemptive and reconciling work, and there’s a final message the church has been given to which nothing can be added. Hebrews begins by saying God has spoken many times in the past, but he’s spoken finally by his Son. If you put those two things together — the finished work and the final word — you have the message of Hebrews, but you’re not likely to get that without going through the Book and saying, What’s the argument running throughout it? The writer is saying: Don’t slip away from this Word. Don’t add to it, because the work of Christ as a priest has been finished and you are reconciled to God. If you’re reconciled, then nobody can do anything to make you more reconciled and more acceptable.

How do we train people to have the mental discipline to follow a line of reasoning, to get into the text and see the big picture with us?

Most people prefer order and logic to muddle. We sometimes should say to the preacher, “Order! Order! Where are you going? What’s your order?” Most people prefer the preacher to have some kind of order so they know which direction they’re meant to be going. We call that “logic on fire.” That comes from Martin Lloyd-Jones, who said the sermon should be known by its logic, but that logic must be on fire, so it’s not just cold, academic logic.

The great sermon of Paul to the Athenians is exactly that: logic on fire. It has a clear line of teaching about their ignorance and why they are ignorant and what they ought to do about it. Some people like emotional muddle, but after a while they prefer to have their mind addressed and satisfied. It’s like when we were kids. We liked all the wrong food, but as we grew up we preferred more nourishing food. As you grow up spiritually, you prefer something that nourishes your mind as well as your heart.

On Sunday I’m going to be preaching on the Ethiopian in Acts 8. One of the things we have to do when we come to a familiar story like that is to look at the structure the writer uses in telling the story. The writer has a hand in this and is telling the story with a point in view. Now you can use that story in a number of different ways. I read a book on personal evangelism based on the Ethiopian story, and that is legitimate. I’ve often kept that story up my sleeve when I’ve been asked at short notice to speak to businessmen, because it’s a story of a businessman who met Christ. But neither of those reasons is the reason Luke tells the story. Luke tells the story because the church in Acts 8 is beginning to go out into the whole world. It’s the time when the disciples are driven out of Jerusalem, first to Samaria and then to the outermost ends of the earth. So Acts 8 stands as the first chapter in that great expansion of the church out into the world. And Luke wants to tell us what is true evangelistic ministry.

Now I imagine Luke’s study was pretty untidy, because he’s got material coming in all the time of preaching, of campaigns, of wonderful things, of persecution and so on. But he actually spends a whole chapter with two stories — Simon the magician, which is a false picture of ministry, and the Ethiopian and Philip, which is a true picture of ministry. So I want to know what he’s got in his mind when he writes the story. He’s wanting to say to me: Philip, led by the Spirit, is giving you a pattern of how to evangelize. The first point is that the Ethiopian says to him, “How can I understand this Book without a teacher?” Luke is saying the Bible is not self-explanatory, that God has appointed teachers. Then when I turn to the Pastoral Epistles, I discover only one professional qualification is needed to be a minister: he’s got to be an apt teacher. So when I come back to the Ethiopian, I find it fascinating that the Holy Spirit sends Philip into the desert, into an evangelistic campaign that can’t have been a very welcome invitation, where he meets one person reading a Bible he doesn’t understand. The Ethiopian says to him, “Will you come up and guide me?” And the Greek word simply means “explain it,” “teach it to me.”

So Luke is telling me that evangelism starts at understanding the Scriptures and that evangelism is not collecting scalps; it’s not getting people emotionally tied up, and it’s not asking for a decision when people don’t know what they’re being asked to decide about. It starts with Bible teaching. It’s immensely encouraging to a young minister who feels he ought to leave evangelism to the professionals when he’s told, “If I teach the Bible, I’m beginning the evangelistic enterprise.” That comes from looking at the structure of the story.

At Proclamation Trust we have a preaching principle called “Question Time.” We take that from the passage in the synoptic Gospels where Christ is under fire with questions. He often asks a question in return. In fact, occasionally he says, “I won’t answer your question until you answer mine: Where did John the Baptist get his authority from?” And they don’t want to answer it, so he says he won’t answer. What we learn is that the preacher is not there primarily to answer the questions people have; he’s primarily there to present the questions God is asking us.

When I was ministering at universities, I used to be pushed up against the wall by students, and they used to batter me with questions. God was in the dock. The impression was that if I could tell them why God had made the world in such a rotten way, they might possibly presume to believe in him. That is a completely wrong way to go about Christian apologetics. God is not in the dock. It is we who are in the dock. My job as a preacher is to bring to people’s attention the great questions God asks that they would never hear otherwise.

When I was preaching to yuppies in London, many of whom in their twenties were beginning to make a great deal of money, I asked them questions like, “What shall it profit a man to gain the whole world and lose his soul?” I would simply put before them a profit-and-loss account and say, “I can gain the whole world. I can take over Harrods. I can take over the Bank of England. I can become a multimillionaire and then die and lose my soul and go to hell eternally. Where is the profit in that?” They never had anybody put that question to them before. That question which God asks us in Christ’s words is infinitely more important than a question they might ask me, which is largely a result of their ignorance, because they’ve not sat under Bible teaching.

So in “Question Time” we’re trying to say the church ought to be on the front foot, not the back foot — not because we want to be proud or difficult, but because actually we are the people in the dock and God is the one who is asking the questions. The preacher needs to know his responsibility.

Take Psalm 2 It begins with that magnificent question: Why do the rulers and kings of the earth unite together and rage against the Lord and his anointed? That’s not a question anybody ever asks. The questions we ask and that are on our daily paper are: Why do the Palestinians and Jews fight against each other, and why can’t we stop them? That’s an important question. That’s not the question the Bible is asking. The Bible is asking: Why is the world fighting against God? “Well,” says Mr. Jones, listening to that, “I never knew it was.” We can then go on to the New Testament and show that we are all by nature not apathetic toward God but antagonistic. You and I didn’t learn that until the Holy Spirit began to teach us what an enemy we’ve got in our own hearts toward God. But you soon learn that as a pastor or a Christian worker, because you talk to people about Christian things and find an enormous hostility whenever the thing comes close to them. Psalm 2:1 raises that great question, which people would never otherwise hear.

Interview used with kind permission of Preaching Today and The Proclamation Trust.

Will “Christian” = “African” someday?

In the future, if you’re a Christian, you most likely will be an African!

By 2060, 40% of all Christians will live in Africa, according to a recent Pew Research study.[1] Currently, about 26% of Christians live there. Why the change?

Several factors are at play: Africa has higher birth rates than the West, the West is quickly secularizing, and – let’s not forget – Christ is building His church in Africa!

This presents us with an amazing opportunity to impact the future of the global church. It also begs the question of how healthy the African church will be if the prosperity gospel and other unbiblical doctrines drive much of this growth.

That’s why LRI focuses on empowering African leaders to lead movements of God’s Word in their countries. 

Consider these testimonies from three African brothers who have gone through our training:

Francis, a church planter in Togo:

“The training helps to avoid heresies and to help them focus on the Word, and to avoid this framework . . . Most of the time in Africa, because of the background we have in animism, we try to enforce our points of view on the text. We, instead of letting the text speak to us, we want to speak on behalf of the text. . . . We need to work on that and avoid that.”

Bonigava Johnson from Uganda:

“I’ve seen tremendous improvement in my preparation of the sermons and also in the trainings I do with the youth and the students in [the] Kisoro Baptist Association. . . . [LRI’s] tools . . . equip and empower the head and also go deep into your heart so that you do not [just] have the knowledge about God, but you experience Him in your day-to-day life, so that by the time you finish preparing the sermon, you are already a transformed being. Bringing the training deep into the countryside of Uganda. . . . opened the opportunity for those who are not able to find these trainings in other places that Leadership Resources trained. . . . I want to pray that this training will continue to go far and wide so that the church is equipped.”

Peter Motunga from Kenya:

“What I was preaching, I could not understand very clearly. In fact, I was just babbling, babbling in the ministry. And when I entered the TNT, I started knowing who God is. I started knowing the mind of God. I started knowing on how to preach this gospel. That’s why I said that I was blind but now I can see. . . . I can say that now I am pregnant, and I am about to deliver. And what I’m going to deliver, it is only what I have learned from the TNT.”

Join us in prayer that God would continue to raise up more passionate and gifted men to lead movements of His Word in Africa!

In His service,

Craig Parro

PS: We want the future of African Christianity to be rooted in God’s Word, but we can’t do our work without the support of faithful partners like you. Consider a gift today to help strengthen the African church.

[1] See “Sub-Saharan Africa will be home to growing shares of the world’s Christians and Muslims” on pewresearch.org.

How One Megachurch in Ecuador is Strengthening Their Leadership in God’s Word

What happens when almost 100 people show up for our training?

Our ideal group is limited to 15 or 20. That way, lots of personal attention can be given and each one can fully participate in the discussions. Learning happens best with smaller numbers. So what to do when 100 show up???

Back in 2013 we had a modest beginning in Quito, Ecuador. A group of 23 (too many!) pastors, small group leaders, and members of the preaching team gathered from Iglesia Santísima Trinidad (Church of the Holiest Trinity) for our training. Four years later they graduated. Three key graduates excelled – they loved the training and had a profound burden to see a movement of the Word spread throughout their megachurch’s various sites and their entire country. We call them mentor trainers. 



Even though training had ended, our mentor trainers wanted more leaders in their church to experience the equipping and transformation of the training. So they began organizing another generation of training for other leaders at La Santísima.

The only problem? The number: they had almost 100 sign up. Yikes! That’s way too many . . . but our team didn’t want to say “no.” What was to be done???

Ah-ha! . . . Let’s break the large group into smaller ones and co-lead them with graduates from that very first group. This enabled our LRI team to coach the graduates moving them one step closer to an Ecuadorian-led movement of God’s Word.


One of our MTers, Clever, leads a session

 

Another MT, Oscar Paul, leads another group

 

Olmedo teaches the Traveling Instructions principle.


The response to the training couldn’t have been better. Here’s a sample of what participants shared:

“Other trainings are a monologue. This was asking us to discover the Word ourselves — it was great!”

“I believe that God has had more mercy on me than Jonah.”

“We’ve grown in our understanding [since studying Ruth]. The next training we’ll grow even more.”


The Group of Leaders in Quito


God is at work in Ecuador! He’s also at work in a similar way in the 50+ countries where we work, transforming one heart at a time as His Word is clearly unfolded and understood.

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Enjoy a tour of our training in Quito led by LRI’s Kevin Halloran:

Sarcasm in the Bible?! Dale Ralph Davis on How Old Testament Narrative Uses Sarcasm

Sarcasm in the Bible?! NO WAY

Actually, yes way according to Dr. Dale Ralph Davis. In his helpful book The Word Became Fresh: How to Preach from Old Testament Narrative Texts, Davis explains why sarcasm is used in Old Testament narrative and provides a few examples:

Occasionally the biblical writer dips his pen in acid and uses mockery, derision, or put-down to drive home his point. The device may not be prevalent but likely occurs more often than a casual reader thinks.

One thinks immediately, of course, of Elijah’s taunting the prophets of Baal on Mt. Carmel in 1 Kings 18:27. Elijah alleges that Baal may be preoccupied with a plethora of ‘divine’ activities like travel, napping, or using the facilities. But one finds such ridicule elsewhere, if perhaps less blatantly. One overhears it when Laban accuses Jacob of stealing his household deities: ‘But why did you steal my gods?’ (Gen. 31:30). Any full-blooded Yahweh-worshiping hearer/reader would think, ‘My, what sort of gods are those that can’t keep from being pilfered?’ And anyone who is possessed both with orthodoxy and a sense of humor (too often a rare combination) laughs when these deities ‘feel’ both Rachel’s warmth and weight while she is ‘indisposed’ (31:34–35). The same ridicule seeps out of Micah’s helpless rage toward the Danites in Judges 18:24: ‘You take my gods that I made and the priest, and go away, and what have I left?’ (ESV). What indeed! And, of course, the biblical writer is at his nasty best when describing the divine ‘trauma’ of Dagon before the ark of Yahweh in 1 Samuel 5:1–5; not only do the Philistines have to pick Dagon up but would’ve been most happy with an ample supply of super-glue. One even hears a hint of mockery in the common but repeated ‘made’ in 1 Kings 12:28–33 (Jeroboam’s cult) and in 2 Kings 17:29–31 (imported pagans in the land of Israel). Note too the helplessness of pagan resources in Genesis 41:8, 24, and in Daniel 1:20; 2:1–11; 4:6–7, 18; 5:8, 15, all of which smells like devout scoffing—because those helpless resources are the foil for the true God’s provision via Joseph and Daniel.

One of the most subtle but powerful samples of sarcasm comes in Daniel 3. Here all of Nebuchadnezzar’s civil service corps is to observe the required moment of silence before his 90 by 9 feet image. It’s likely a government-sponsored loyalty exercise; devotees can naturally go back to their private superstitions and ‘personal faith’; they simply need to worship here if they want to keep their jobs—and their lives. The pressure is powerful; after all, it’s the law. And when all the satraps and postal workers have their back sides in the air and their noses in the sand before Nebuchadnezzar’s giant dummy on the Plain of Dura, well, it’s hard to resist. The ‘church music’ alone is impressive (vv. 4–5, 7, 10, 15). And yet the writer both tells the story and mocks the ‘worship.’ He both reports and ridicules at the same time. At least I think so. He repeatedly uses the verb ‘set up’ (Aram. qum) as he refers to Nebuchadnezzar’s image, nine times to be exact (vv. 1, 2, 3 [twice], 5, 7, 12, 14, 18); one can also throw in ‘made’ twice, vv. 1, 15). Perhaps I’m seeing things, but highlight the usages of ‘set up’ in your text, read it over noting them, and it all seems to have a cumulative impact. It’s a ‘set-up job,’ as we say. It’s as if the writer is saying, ‘It may seem fearful (because it has all the muscle of the government behind it), but it’s a farce! If you can see behind the mask, if you can see the falsehood and stupidity of it all, if you can hear heaven’s laughter over it [Ps. 2:4], you need not be taken in by it. True, the furnace is hot but the image is just hot air. It’s simply a little posturing by a human king strutting around in his big international pants’ (cf. Isa. 46:7).

Sarcasm is a form of humor. And I have observed that whenever Scripture is delightfully humorous it is also deadly serious. There is always a serious point being made when the biblical writer uses humor. Hence we should keep our ears tuned for sarcasm.

Excerpt used with kind permission of Christian Focus Publications.

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