Measuring Impact – Video of Webinar with Craig Parro

How should non-profits and missions organizations measure impact?

The challenging (and sometimes ambiguous) nature of measuring impact may deter some from even trying, but LRI President Craig Parro says measuring impact is crucial.

In the webinar Craig Parro hosted with the Barnabas Group in Chicago, IL, Craig unpacks the why and the how of measuring impact. Since every organization is so different, Craig bases much of his talk on how Leadership Resources measures impact training pastors in biblical exposition in the Training National Trainers program.

Download PDF of slides

“Why is it that everyone loves learning, but nobody loves being evaluated?” – Craig Parro

Shouldn’t preaching be more than an info dump? Transformational Preaching in the Philippines

Dear Friends and Partners,

Shouldn’t preaching be more than an info dump?

Instead of preaching his own sermons, Pastor Larry read from Bible commentaries for an information-heavy preaching ministry. After beginning TNT, he learned God’s purpose for information in the Bible isn’t only to inform the mind, but to transform lives. Now equipped to study and preach messages for himself, Larry’s preaching brought new, Spirit-backed power.

Cely, a woman in his church battling stage-four bone and liver cancer, took notice of the new Larry. God was changing her life and her church due to her pastor’s TNT-influenced preaching. She soon found out Pastor Larry was training other pastors all over her country, including in her hometown. “How can I help? I want to sponsor the training there because I know what God has done in my life through you.”

Months later, after arriving at the airport in Cely’s hometown to begin TNT training, Pastor Larry and Pastor Neil heard someone shouting their names from a distance while at baggage claim. It was Cely! She had made the trek against her doctor’s orders to join the two and a half day workshop.

Larry asked Cely if her husband, who isn’t a believer, knew she was funding the training. She replied, “It’s actually from him!” Perplexed, Larry said, “He’s not a believer—why would he want to support this?” Cely recounted her husband’s words, “If this type of preaching can bring about this change in my wife, it’s worthy of my financial investment.”

Cely has since gone to be with the Lord. At her wake, her grieving husband told Pastor Larry, “Tell me what you need and I will still support the training.”

Hearing of God’s goodness in the Philippines made our hearts rejoice. Would you join us in prayer for many more Filipino preachers and congregations to be transformed?

Yours in Christ,

Craig Parro

President

PS: Our opportunities to train in SE Asia and the Philippines have outpaced our resources to fulfill them. Would you consider a generous gift to see many more transformed preachers like Larry in SE Asia?

Preaching the Bible’s Authorial Intent

David Jackman Expository Preaching Gospel Ministry Authorial Intent in Scripture

We recently had a conversation with David Jackman of Proclamation Trust and the Cornhill Training Course on expository preaching, gospel ministry, the author’s intent in the Bible, and preaching the genres of the Bible (watch the full interview).

The video and transcript below share a highlight from the interview on preaching the Bible’s authorial intent.


Todd Kelly: In some conversations about preaching, the phrase or idea of authorial intent is used to describe the task. But, sometimes it just leaves us with a cold theme. Can you explain that concept of authorial intent, and help us to understand how it should shape the sermon, and where it should lead us?

David Jackman: Yes, if God has inspired the Word (as we believe He has), then the human writer, under God, has an intention in writing the Word. Paul didn’t just wake up one morning and say, “Oh, I haven’t got in touch with the Colossians lately, I’ll just drop them a line.” He has a purpose, an authorial intention in writing the Epistle. So our job is to discover what that intention is.

Now that comes from careful study of the text, by comparing Scripture with Scripture, and by immersing ourselves in the actual content of the Word.

But you could teach that in a fairly theoretical, academic sort of way which can leave people cold. They feel there’s nothing there for me and my heart and my life this week. And I think it’s possible to have a sort of preaching that is more like lecturing. It may be accurate, may be faithful, but it doesn’t communicate, doesn’t get it across, doesn’t communicate to the heart.

So if we go from the author’s intention and ask ourselves, “What is God’s pastoral intention in inspiring the author to write this book?” Then we’re making a journey from the mind to the heart—from understanding the text to realizing why the text is there and what the text has to say to us and what its implications are for our lives.

So through the mind to the heart is the journey from authorial intent to pastoral intent. And then if we respond with a heart that is receptive to God’s Word, it will work out in our lives. Preaching is always with a view to change of life. It’s never simply writing information down in your notebook about God. It’s always God is intervening in our lives changing our lives as we understand this truth and apply this truth and relate it to our circumstances. And the other thing the preacher has to do is help the congregation to do that, by giving examples and illustrations and so on. So could you just take us one step further on this journey, in terms of application, because many many preachers this side of the Atlantic feel a pressure to apply the Word of God.

Todd Kelly: Can you tell us the relationship of application to the shepherding intent of the scriptures?

David Jackman: Yes. I rejoice that they find some pressure on that. I think it’s better to have a pressure to apply than to think I don’t need to.

Sometimes people just lay out the fruits of their exegetical study and that’s it. And I don’t think that nurtures the flock as much as they might. So we want to take it a stage further, don’t we. But the application must come from the text. So we’ve got to be on the main line of the text. It’s not a matter of how can I apply this, “Let me bring in an application from outside and bolt it onto the Bible text.”

I sometimes say to my students in London that I know you’ve all got bolt-on applications that you will make if you can’t think of anything else to say, like we ought to read the Bible more, or we ought to pray more, we ought to evangelize more. And all those things are true, but is that why this text is here? What is this text saying in terms of its application to our lives?

That transformational power in preaching—which is the Holy Spirit’s work—comes through the hard work of the study of the preacher and his dependence upon the Spirit’s power in the preaching.

I do think we have to work at that and I think it works through in practical terms so that we begin to carry through what we’ve learned prayerfully and in dependence on God’s grace into our lives, and working for that sort of change that is shaping us into the likeness of Christ. That transformational power in preaching—which is the Holy Spirit’s work—comes through the hard work of the study of the preacher and his dependence upon the Spirit’s power in the preaching.


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